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Panoramic image of Puʻuhonua O Hōnaunau National Historical Park

Panorama created with photos taken from Puʻuhonua O Hōnaunau National Historical Park on the north west of the Big Island of Hawaiʻi.

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Panorama of Puuhonua O Honaunau NHP. The USGS logo is centered looking east; north is to the left and south to the right of the logo.  This image was created using photographs taken from the narrow strip of beach at Keone'ele Cove, the ancient royal canoe landing at Puuhonua O Honaunau National Historical Park (PUHO). Keoneele Cove is known as a haven for sea turtles, which are often found sunning themselves on the nearshore volcanic platform. USGS scientist wearing a backpack GPS is standing at the edge of one of the many anchialine ponds found at PUHO. These brackish ponds, located near the shoreline along the coast of Hawaiian islands, are connected to the ocean via subterranean fissures and fluctuate slightly with tides. The ponds host a variety of unusual plants and animals, many of which are only found in this fragile environment.

The USGS logo is centered looking east; north is to the left and south to the right of the logo. This image was created using photographs taken from the narrow strip of beach at Keoneʻele Cove, the ancient royal canoe landing at Puʻuhonua O Hōnaunau National Historical Park (PUHO). Keoneʻele Cove is known as a haven for sea turtles, which are often found sunning themselves on the nearshore volcanic platform. USGS scientist (wearing a backpack GPS) is standing at the edge of one of the many anchialine ponds found at PUHO. These brackish ponds, located near the shoreline along the coast of Hawaiian islands, are connected to the ocean via subterranean fissures and fluctuate slightly with tides. The ponds host a variety of unusual plants and animals, many of which are only found in this fragile environment.

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Page Last Modified: 12 December 2014 (sac)