USGS - science for a changing world

Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center

We conduct multidisciplinary scientific research in the coastal and offshore areas of California, Oregon, Washington, Alaska, Hawaii, and other US Pacific Islands; and in other waterways of the United States.

December 2014

Center News

Photos, at left, of Wallerconcha sarae, and at right, of USGS chief scientist Brian Edwards, with USGS researcher Andy Stevenson collecting samples from the gravity corer. Shaded relief bathymetry draped draped by slope gradient, warm colors indicate steep slope, cool colors indicate gentle slope. Chrysogorgia sp. coral being collected on October 15, 2011, at a depth of 1,094 meters or 3,600 feet in the Gulf of Mexico from the vessel Holiday Chouest using the Schilling ultra-heavy-duty remotely operated vehicle. Image was acquired with an AquaPix AquaSLR digital still camera held by the ROV manipulator arm. Photo courtesy of Penn State Professor of Biology Charles Fisher. Figure 1 from USGS Tectonics paper on the junction between the San Andreas and Calaveras faults, reprinted in a KQED blog about the paper. Red lines are active faults; yellow dots are earthquake locations; H marks the town of Hollister. The Free-Ascending Tripod being deployed in the South China Sea from the vessel Aquilla on April 19, 2014.

New Bivalve Species Discovered in Arctic Ocean Sediment

A new species of bivalve mollusk (clams, mussels, oysters, and their kin) was discovered more than 2.5 kilometers (1.5 miles) below the Arctic Ocean surface off northern Alaska. Read more...

Mapping Fault Deformation and Large Submarine Landslides Off Southern California

To better understand offshore earthquake and tsunami hazards, USGS scientists from the Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center and the Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center ran a multichannel seismic survey off southern California in late November. Read more...

Extreme Longevity and Slow Growth Rates of Deep-Sea Corals in Area Affected by Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Highlight Vulnerability

USGS scientists Nancy Prouty and Amanda Demopoulos and academic colleagues published “Growth rates and ages of deep-sea corals impacted by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill” in Deep-Sea Research II in November 2014. Read more...

3D Study of Fault Junction Featured on KQED Science Blog

A recent Tectonics paper by USGS scientists studying the junction between California’s San Andreas and Calaveras faults was featured in a KQED Science Blog. Blog author Andrew Alden described how USGS geophysicist Janet Watt and colleagues combined geologic and geophysical data to develop a 3D picture, or model, of the fault junction. Read more...

Free-Ascending Tripod Brings Data from the Deep Seafloor of the South China Sea

Data and discoveries from this project will be at the forefront of deepwater marine-geology research for the region and probably for the world. Practical applications include choosing favorable sites for undersea cables and other infrastructure. Read more...

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Sound Waves Newsletter

Thumbnail image from news story.Cover Story:
Natural Methane Seepage Is Widespread on the U.S. Atlantic Ocean Margin

 

PCMSC Seminar Series

Please join us for scientific talks and presentations given by local scientists and researchers.

http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/seminar/

Weds., January 21, 2015, 2:00 pm

Karla Knudson

UC Santa Cruz

Weds., January 28, 2015, 2:00 pm

Rob Kayen

USGS PCMSC Research Civil Engineer

Weds., February 4, 2015, 2:00 pm

Eric Geist

USGS PCMSC Research Geophysicist

Weds., March 18, 2015, 2:00 pm

Tom Parsons

USGS PCMSC Research Geophysicist

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