Coastal & Marine Geology InfoBank

Home FACS Activities Atlas Geology School Related Sites More

USGS CMG 05014 Metadata

Skip navigational links
Loading
Activities: by ID   by Platform   by Year   by Region   by Participant   by Organization   by Project/Theme   with Incomplete IDs   Disclaimer  
Activity First Letter: A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z   0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  
Virtual Globes: Atlas  (GE)    Samples  (GE)    Moorings  (GE)    Illuminate Oceans  (GE)    Earthquakes  (GE)    Get GE    InfoBank examples    State Waters    Chronology  (GE)    Gravity Base Stations  (GE)
ID 05014
Also Known As 05014
B-1-05-NR
Abstract United States Geological Survey, Woods Hole, Massachusetts. Chief Scientists: John Bratton, Reide Corbett, East Carolina University. Data (Bathymetry, Navigation-GPS, Navigation-Hypack, Sensors-temperature, Sensors-salinity, AGI resistivity streamer, Radon mapping system 6 RAD7s, Piezometers, pumps) of field activity 05014 (B-1-05-NR) in Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina, from 05/01/2005 to 05/12/2005
Organization United States Geological Survey, Woods Hole, Massachusetts
Project/Theme Atlantic Coastal Groundwater Systems
Coastal Change Hazards
Chief Scientist John Bratton
Reide Corbett
Platform Beeliner
Area of Operation Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina,, North Carolina
Bounding Coordinates
35.50000
-77.50000     -76.50000
34.70000
Ports MAY 1, 2005 - New Bern, NC
MAY 12, 2005 - New Bern, NC
Dates 05/01/2005 (JD 121) to 05/12/2005 (JD 132)
Analog Materials No analog holdings.
Information Specialist
John Bratton
Crew
Reide Corbett East Carolina University, Chief Scientist
John Bratton co-Chief Sci
John Crusius co-Chief Sci
Dirk Koopmans mobilization and field tech support
Emile Bergeron resistivity survey
Veeann Cross resistivity surveying, data processing, and navigation
Reide Cobett radioisotope sampling and analysis-ECU
Eric Diaddorio ECU, Captain
Clay McCoy ECU, Captain
Equipment Used
Bathymetry
Navigation-GPS
Navigation-Hypack
Sensors-temperature
Sensors-salinity
AGI resistivity streamer
Radon mapping system 6 RA (D7s)
Piezometers
pumps
Purpose
Supplemental field investigation: radon mapping, electrical resistivity survey, 
surface water and ground-water sampling
Information to be Derived
Times series data;Samples and Chemical Analysis;Electrical resistivity data
Summary
Resistivity data compiled in OFR
2005-1306 and presented at GSA (abstract below).
Radon data presented at Estuarine Research
Federation meeting in Norfolk, VA, October 2005
(abstract below)  2005 Salt Lake City Annual
Meeting (October 16-19, 2005), Paper No. 211-13
DELINEATION OF NEARSHORE FRESHWATER-SALTWATER
RELATIONSHIPS IN SUBMARINE GROUND WATER USING
CONTINUOUS RESISTIVITY PROFILING AND PIEZOMETER
TRANSECTS IN THE NEUSE RIVER ESTUARY  BRATTON,
John F., Coastal and Marine Geology Program,
U.S. Geological Survey, 384 Woods Hole Rd, Woods
Hole, MA 02543-1598, jbratton@usgs.gov, CRUSIUS,
John, USGS, Woods Hole, MA 02543, CROSS, VeeAnn
A., USGS, Woods Hole, MA 02543, and KOOPMANS,
Dirk J., ETI Professionals, Inc, USGS, Woods
Hole, MA 02543 The Neuse River Estuary (NC), a
broad V-shaped water body (avg. ~70 km x 6.5 km
x 3.6 m) located on the southwestern end of
Pamlico Sound, suffers from severe
eutrophication. Several water quality models
have recently been developed to aid in
management of nutrient loading to the estuary.
To constrain model estimates of the fraction of
nutrients delivered by direct ground-water
discharge, field measurements were made in April
2004 and May 2005. Continuous resistivity
profiling (CRP) was used to measure electrical
resistivity of sediments, a property that is
sensitive to differences in salinity of
submarine ground water. The 2004 and 2005
surveys used floating 100-m and 50-m CRP
streamers, respectively. A total of ~200 km of
data was collected in the upstream half of the
estuary and processed using AGI EarthImager 2D
software. Penetration was ~20-27 m below the
seafloor (mbsf) for the 100-m streamer, and
~12-14 mbsf for the 50-m streamer. At four
transect sites extending up to 70 m from shore,
piezometers were hand-driven to depths of up to
4 mbsf in water depths of up to 2.5 m to collect
ground-water samples for measurement of
salinity, nutrients, and radon and radium
isotopes. Data from CRP surveys indicated that
high-resistivity (fresher) ground water is
present at depths of ~3-5 mbsf in a zone ~100 m
wide parallel to shore that becomes narrower
downstream as the estuary widens and becomes
more saline. This is consistent with piezometer
samples that yielded salinities of <1 psu 35-50
m from shore at some locations. At several
piezometer sites, ground-water samples were more
saline than overlying waters, suggesting that
shallow ground water reflects average annual
salinities while surface water salinity varies
seasonally. The depth to fresher ground water
increases offshore, gradually at first and then
sharply. In some upstream areas, fresher water
reappears extending more than 1 km offshore at a
consistent depth of 3-5 mbsf. A brackish zone
more than 10 m thick separates the nearshore and
offshore fresher zones. Changes in underlying
geology may be partially responsible for this.
These survey results will be used in combination
with measurements of radon and radium in surface
water, as well as seepage meter measurements to
calculate the quantity of ground water and the
associated nutrient load being delivered to the
estuary.   ERF 2005 meeting abstract:  Submarine
groundwater discharge to the Neuse River Estuary
(NC) determined from continuous radon
measurements  Author(s) Crusius, J., US
Geological Survey Brattton, J. F., US Geological
Survey Koopmans, D., US Geological Survey
Spruill, T., US Geological Survey Corbett, D.
R., East Carolina University   Type Poster +
Summary  Session SPS-04 - Identifying,
Assessing, and Managing Human and
Climatically-Induced Change of Estuarine
Ecosystems   In many coastal waters submarine
groundwater discharge (SGD) is an important
vector for delivery of nutrients. However, SGD
is frequently diffuse and difficult to quantify.
In this work we sought to infer locations and
rates of groundwater discharge to the Neuse
River Estuary, North Carolina, using
measurements of radon in surface water and
groundwater. Radon is an excellent tracer of SGD
because it: 1) is strongly enriched in
groundwater relative to surface water; 2) is
non-reactive; 3) is continuously supplied by
long-lived parent isotopes; and 4) integrates
over a wide area. We carried out continuous
measurements of radon during a two-day period of
April, 2004 in the surface water offshore of
Cherry Point where seismic evidence suggested a
buried paleochannel filled with coarse sediments
might be a conduit for groundwater discharge.
Elevated radon activities observed near this
site are consistent with groundwater discharge
in this vicinity. Radon activities measured
continuously at a nearshore site were roughly
inversely proportional to tidal height.
Groundwater discharge velocities calculated from
the radon data averaged 6 cm/d during a two-day
interval of relatively low tide. These values
are comparable to estimates based on seepage
meters. Additional fieldwork is planned for the
spring of 2005.    M  Modified abstract
presented at meeting: Submarine groundwater
discharge to the Neuse River Estuary (NC)
determined from continuous radon measurements
John Crusius; John Bratton; Dirk Koopmans  USGS;
Woods Hole Science Center; 384 Woods Hole Road;
Woods Hole, MA  02543; jcrusius@usgs.gov
Timothy Spruill; U.S. Geological Survey, 3916
Sunset Ridge Road, Raleigh, NC 27607;  D. Reide
Corbett; Department of Geology; East Carolina
University; Greenville, NC 27858  In many
coastal waters submarine groundwater discharge
(SGD) is an important of nutrients.  However,
SGD is frequently diffuse and difficult to
quantify. In this work we sought to infer
locations and rates of groundwater discharge to
the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina, using
measurements of radon in surface water and
groundwater.  Radon is an excellent tracer of
SGD because: 1) it is strongly enriched in
groundwater relative to surface water; 2) it
behaves conservatively over the full estuarine
salinity range; 3) it's continuously supplied by
long-lived parent isotopes; and 4)
quantification of discharge based on radon
measurements integrates over a large area.  We
carried out measurements of radon spanning a 50
km stretch of the Neuse River during early May,
2005.   Radon was measured continuously from a
ship using a method similar to that described by
Burnett et al. (2001).  The highest radon
activities (200 Bq m-3 = 12 dpm L-1) were
observed in the northern ~20 km of the sampling
area (north of New Bern).  These radon
activities are roughly 30 times higher than can
be supported by diffusive inputs from sediments,
and are therefore attributed to significant
groundwater discharge in this region of the
river.  A steady-state box model suggests that
the radon inventories can be explained by
groundwater discharge that comparable to ~2% to
10% of the river flow.  Reducing the uncertainty
in this estimate will require reduction in the
uncertainty in the radon content of groundwater.
Notes
Significant resistivity and radon results
to be presented in two journal articles,
manuscripts are in prep. (January 2006).  This
field effort builds on previous related work in
April 2004 (field activity # 04013)
Publications
Cross, V.A., Bratton, J.F., Bergeron, Emile, Meunier, J.K., Crusius, John, and 
Koopmans, Dirk, 2006, Continuous Resistivity Profiling Data from the Upper Neuse 
River Estuary, North Carolina, 2004-2005, U.S. Geological Survey Open-File 
Report 2005-1306, URL:
http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2005/1306/index.htm
Got Help? For 05014, we would appreciate any information on -- activity type, analog materials, contract, days at sea, dive count, funding, kms of navigation, national plan, NGDC Info, owner, project number, scanned materials, seismic description, station count, station description, submersible, tabulated info.
Type Webpage KMZ Arc         Metadata         WHSC
Geochemical       data
Metadata data     txt  data  FAQ  xml data
Navigation data nav      
Times   050.times      

05014 location map of where navigation 

equipment operated

 
Skip footer navigational links

Coastal and Marine Science Centers:  Pacific   St. Petersburg   Woods Hole  
InfoBank   Coastal and Marine Geology Program   Geologic Information   Ask-A-Geologist   USGS Disclaimer  


Accessibility FOIA Privacy Policies and Notices

Take Pride in America logo USA.gov logo U.S. Department of the Interior | U.S. Geological Survey
URL: http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/b/b105nr/html/b-1-05-nr.meta.html
Page Contact Information: InfoBank staff
Page Last Modified: Tue Oct 29 07:48:07 PDT 2013  (chd)